The Snails Are Back

Snails and slugs have reportedly been less of a problem for gardeners this year. A couple of months ago on Gardeners’ Question Time someone from the RHS was saying their members had experienced fewer problems from slugs and snails, probably due to a dry Spring.

Well this had been the case on my patio until recently. But when I went to examine my broad beans one Sunday evening I found one of the foul cr’eatures eating its way through a leaf. I flung it across the patio and then felt slightly guilty. The peas have been destroyed – I should have noticed earlier. It’s amazing how quickly the snails can cause havoc.
Peas plants eaten by snails

So it’s out with the pellets and Slug Gone mulch. I’ve also put copper rings around a few of the plants but I’m not convinced this does anything. Most of the actual pots already have copper tape around them and that didn’t stop the slimy suckers. Slug Gone was praised on the Organic Garden Catalogue website when I bought it but it can’t be that good because they don’t sell it any more. I suppose it’s beneficial as a mulch anyway but now I’ve finished it I’ve bought what seems to be their latest favourite: Slug Snub. These are heavily re-caffeinated coffee grounds which is supposed to suppress snails’ appetites. The pellets must be useless because I never find any bodies. I have a trap filled with beer too. Hopefully one of these approaches will do some good!



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3 Responses

  1. Slug Gone didn’t seem to work for us either, however the Organic Catalogue does still sell it:
    http://www.organiccatalogue.com/p2804/SLUG-GONE/GROW-AID-20-litres/product_info.html

  2. hey did the slug snub work in the end?

    • I’ve now concluded the best way to keep the snails under control is by using the good old fashioned pellets. Some people say they’re bad foor birds but there doesn’t seem any evidence for that. They are harmful to cats and dogs but I only use them at my allotment, not my patio. Perhaps once the plants are bigger/stronger some deterrent spray (of garlic or commercially available) can help, but the most vulnerable time is young plants/seedlings and I’ve found no better way than pellets.

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